A Suit and a Tie

“It goes without saying that a right tie completes men’s outfit and can literally work wonders. Suppose you see a man, an anchor, a businessman, or a politician on the TV; ask yourself what draws your attention first of all? I bet your answer is “their face.” What is the next – their tie?”  Antonio Centeno, President at A Tailored Suit, Austin, Texas

Why Do Some Men Complain About Having To Wear A Tie?

“In the 1960s, there was a definite lapse in the inclination of men to wear ties, as a result of the rebellion against both tradition and the formality of dress. But by the mid-1970s, this trend had reversed itself. Ties have been used to proclaim status, occupation, and even identity, as well as allegiance to a group or cause, often military. Neckwear has also had utilitarian purposes—to protect the neck or hide buttons on a shirt.”

Everything worn by the priest was to be whole and without blemish. By those beautiful official garments was represented the character of the great antitype, Jesus Christ. Nothing but perfection, in dress and attitude, in word and spirit, could be acceptable to God. He is holy, and His glory and perfection must be represented by the earthly service. Nothing but perfection could properly represent the sacredness of the heavenly service. Finite man might rend his own heart by showing a contrite and humble spirit. This God would discern. But no rent must be made in the priestly robes, for this would mar the representation of heavenly things. The high priest who dared to appear in holy office, and engage in the service of the sanctuary, with a rent robe, was looked upon as having severed himself from God. By rending his garment he cut himself off from being a representative character. He was no longer accepted by God as an officiating priest. This course of action, as exhibited by Caiaphas, showed human passion, human imperfection.  {DA 709.1}

Does The Tie Complete The Suit?

“The tie completes the suit and also allows a dash of individualism/colour to an otherwise plain background (ie white/blue shirt). In some ways, a well-chosen tie can show that the wearer cares about appearance (in a good way) and has a co-ordinated fashion sense.”

“I still think the tie completes the package when wearing a suit. I’m in my 20s.” Forum Archive.

The garments of the high priest were of costly material and beautiful workmanship, befitting his exalted station. In addition to the linen dress of the common priest, he wore a robe of blue, also woven in one piece. Around the skirt it was ornamented with golden bells, and pomegranates of blue, purple, and scarlet. Outside of this was the ephod, a shorter garment of gold, blue, purple, scarlet, and white. It was confined by a girdle of the same colors, beautifully wrought. The ephod was sleeveless, and on its gold-embroidered shoulder pieces were set two onyx stones, bearing the names of the twelve tribes of Israel.  {PP 350.3}

The pattern of the priestly robes was made known to Moses in the mount. Every article the high priest was to wear, and the way it should be made, were specified. These garments were consecrated to a most solemn purpose. By them was represented the character of the great antitype, Jesus Christ. They covered the priest with glory and beauty, and made the dignity of his office to appear. When clothed with them, the priest presented himself as a representative of Israel, showing by his garments the glory that Israel should reveal to the world as the chosen people of God. Nothing but perfection, in dress and attitude, in spirit and word, would be acceptable to God. He is holy; and His glory and perfection must be represented in the earthly service. Nothing but perfection could properly represent the sacredness of the heavenly service. Finite man might rend his own heart by showing a contrite and humble spirit; but no rent must be made in the priestly robes (YI June 7, 1900).  {5BC 1104.5}

Everything worn by the high priest was to be whole and without blemish. The pattern of the priestly robes was made known to Moses in the mount. Every article the high priest was to wear, and the way it should be made, were specified. These garments were consecrated to a most solemn purpose. By them was represented the character of the great antitype, Jesus Christ. They covered the priest with glory and beauty, and made the dignity of his office to appear. When clothed with them, the priest presented himself as a representative of Israel, showing by his garments the glory that Israel should reveal to the world as the chosen people of God. Nothing but perfection, in dress and attitude, in spirit and word, would be acceptable to God. He is holy; and his glory and perfection must be represented in the earthly service. Nothing but perfection could properly represent the sacredness of the heavenly service. Finite man might rend his own heart by showing a contrite and humble spirit; but no rent must be made in the priestly robes.  {YI, June 7, 1900 par. 3}

If the earthly high priests had to go to so much labour and trouble to wear special attire for the presence of God, is it such a headache for men today to wear a simple tie to complete their suit?

“Black or dark material is more becoming to a minister in the desk, and will make a better impression upon the people, than would be made by a combination of two or three different colors in his apparel.–Testimonies, vol. 2, p. 610. (1871)  {Ev 672.1}

In dress and behavior we are to reveal propriety. Never are we to be slack or untidy in our appearance or our work. –Letter 49, 1902.  {Ev 672.2}

The Beauty of Holiness

Character is a robe that that we will wear. Many people only keep it on the character concepts but they don’t realise we will wear that character. If we wear that character, what are you wearing now? What are we wearing when we wear that robe of heaven? If you have a beautiful character, if your heart is filled with the beauty of the kingdom of heaven and you have been born again then you have in your heart the beauty of Christ. What is the external of that?

The dress and its arrangement upon the person is generally found to be the index of the man or the woman. {CG 413.4}

If you are a godly person in the heart and if you have in the sight of God of great beauty and a meek and quiet spirit, how will it be reflected externally? By a meek and quiet spirit. How do you do that? Is it in the things that you practically do and the things you wear? It is the index of what is inside. Here is the connecting link with beauty of the heart and the external manifestation. This is important to be mediated on as our heart must be converted to dress according to Gods beauty. Here is what is meant with the garments of the priesthood. They were the reflection of the internal. That is why God said make them to my instruction for beauty and glory. Every time you look at the priest hood garments, you look at what God esteems as beautiful. Look at the garment of the priest. As you study carefully what God means with the beauty of that garment, a reflection of what it is in the heart, that is what that garment is going to demonstrate. Look at the principle.

http://sabbathsermons.com/2009/08/16/the-beauty-of-holiness/

   Our words, our actions, and our dress are daily, living preachers, gathering with Christ, or scattering abroad. This is no trivial matter, to be passed off with a jest. The subject of dress demands serious reflection and much prayer. Many unbelievers have felt that they were not doing right in permitting themselves to be slaves of fashion; but when they see some who make a high profession of godliness dressing as worldlings dress, enjoying frivolous society, they decide that there can be no wrong in such a course.– Testimonies, vol. 4, p. 641. (1881)  {Ev 673.1} 

Carefulness in dress is an important consideration. The minister should be clothed in a manner befitting the dignity of his position. Some ministers have failed in this respect. In some cases not only has there been a lack of taste and of orderly arrangement in the dress, but the clothing has been untidy and slovenly.  {Ev 673.3}

The God of heaven, whose arm moves the world, who gives us life and sustains us in health, is honored or dishonored by the apparel of those who officiate in His honor.–Gospel Workers, p. 173. (1915)  {Ev 674.1}

In gaining a preparation for the ministry, young men should be associated with older ministers. Those who have gained an experience in active service are to take young, inexperienced workers with them into the harvest field, teaching them how to labor successfully for the conversion of souls. Kindly and affectionately these older workers are to help the younger ones to prepare for the work to which the Lord may call them. And the young men in training should respect the counsel of their instructors, honoring their devotion, and remembering that their years of labor have given them wisdom. . . .  {Ev 683.2}

“I think the tie still serves a purpose though and pulls the suit together. It can look alright without it sometimes but mostly better with a tie”

“I do enjoy wearing a tie when while I have to. As one poster said, it completes the suit. I don’t mind looking spiffy in a crisp ironed shirt and a nicely knotted silk tie. Besides, in cold Canberra, the tie doesn’t seem that much of a burden either. It actually works quite well in keeping oneself warm.” Google Forums.

The Sabbath

All should have a special Sabbath suit, to be worn when attending service in God’s house. While we should not conform to worldly fashions, we are not to be indifferent in regard to our outward appearance. We are to be neat and trim, though without adornment. The children of God should be pure within and without.  {CG 531.2}

If there are worthy persons who, with their whole heart, would honor the Lord of the Sabbath, and the worship of God, and who can not obtain a change of clothing, let those who are able give to such a Sabbath suit, that they may appear in the house of God with cleanly, fitting apparel.  {RH, January 23, 1900 par. 7}

And some men who profess to be Christians view the matter of dress in the same light. They assemble with God’s people upon the Sabbath, with their clothing dusty, and soiled, and even with gaping rents in them, and placed upon their persons in a slovenly manner. {BLJ 199.3}

This class, if they had an engagement to meet a friend honored by the world, and they wished to be especially favored by him or her, would exert themselves to appear . . . with the best apparel that could be obtained; for this friend would feel insulted were they to come . . . with hair uncombed, and garments uncleanly, and in disorder. {BLJ 199.4}

Yet these persons think that it is no matter in what dress they appear, or what is the condition of their persons, when they meet upon the Sabbath to worship the great God. They assemble in His house, which is as the audience chamber of the Most High, where heavenly angels are in attendance, with but little respect, or reverence, as their persons and clothing indicate. Their whole appearance typifies the character of such men and women. {BLJ 199.5}

The favorite theme of this class is pride of dress. Decency, taste, and order, they regard as pride. And according to the dress of these mistaken souls will be their conversation, their acts, and their deal. They are careless, and often low in their conversation at their homes, among their brethren and sisters, and before the world. The dress, and its arrangement upon the person, is generally found to be the index of the man or the woman. Those who are careless and untidy in dress are seldom elevated in their conversation, and possess but little refinement of feelings. They sometimes consider oddity and coarseness, humility. . . . {BLJ 199.6}

Our God is a God of order, and He is not in any degree pleased with distraction, with filthiness, or with sin.—Selected Messages, book 2, pp. 475, 476. {BLJ 199.7}

The tie when plain is a becoming part of a man’s attire. It has been suggested that men’s ties are of a pagan origin.

Louis XIV adopted the decorative silk scarf in 1636 from a group of Croatian mercenaries visiting the royal palace – and thus the word cravat is derived from Croat. Another theory has it that the cravat evolved in England, as a means of holding together the linen and lace collars of the day, out of the way of a man’s long flowing coiffure.

As the 18th century unfolded, so did the cravat, becoming longer and lacier at its ends. For a while it looked like the cravat had had its day when the stock, a heavily stiffened strip of material fastened at the back of the neck, became popular in the middle decades. During the French Revolution. It was here that neckwear probably first took on a political symbolism.

The father of the modern necktie construction goes to the American tie manufacturer Jesse Langsdorf. The British and the Europeans were still the arbiters of style, and those with the most influence were the Royals. The Duke of Windsor led the post-Depression fashion-supression, with muted suits and ties strictly in solids or stripes. The legacy that has been left, however, was a more subtle one – and this is where bona-fide tie for the Duke had introduced the world to a new knot.

After the Second World War, the status of the tie was to change radically.

For nearly 100 years (since 1902) the tie has survived as an acceptable accessory for men’s attire.

http://sabbathsermons.com/2011/11/16/i-thank-god-for-the-reform-dress/

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Posted on 04/03/2012, in Dress Reform and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Xolani Mphakathi

    Thanx for such powerful information. Most young people have a problem on siuts and tie wearing. So i believe by this message many will be helped.

  2. A suit is also worn at funerals …..Why would I wear such on a Blesses Sabbath where we are to be happy and blessed ???

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